Welcome to Our Website

Our mission is to provide quality nursing care and related services to the sick in their own homes. We give priority to the poor, foster the integrity of family life and assist the elderly and chronically ill to stay at home. We provide these services without regard to the origin, creed or other status of the individual.

Our Impact

  • The In-Home Nursing Program helps poor, frail seniors to remain in their homes safely, healthy and as independent as possible for as long as possible in the lowest-cost health care site – their home. In 2018, DHHA provided 145 In-Home patients with 6,121 visits totaling 12,217 of care.

  • Wellness Clinics at low-income senior housing sites offer prevention and early intervention nursing services all of which support and empower older adults to be accountable for their health. In 2018, DHHA served 613 at-risk seniors through 19 Wellness Clinics with 2,979 visits at no charge. 

  • The Durable Medical Equipment Loan Program provides a wide range of adaptive equipment such as wheelchairs and walkers, etc. enhancing mobility and self-sufficiency for our patients as well as others in the community with limited resources. In 2018, DHHA loaned 1,198 pieces of adaptive equipment to 872 recipients in need from our community. 

Here's Why You Should Adopt a Pet from a Shelter

Here's Why You Should Adopt a Pet from a Shelter

Have you been thinking about expanding your family to add a new furry friend? Look no further than your nearest animal shelter. We’ve compiled a list of the top reasons you should consider a shelter animal for your next pet.

You’ll be saving a life.
In the United States, early 3 million dogs and cats are euthanized every year. When you adopt a pet from a shelter, you’re giving that animal a second chance. They’ve likely been given up or abandoned, and by taking them into your home, you’re giving them the loving home they deserve. You’ll also be opening up shelter space for a new animal that needs it.

Adopting costs less than buying from a breeder or pet store.
When you adopt a pet from a shelter, they’re often already spayed/neutered and have their first vaccinations. Some are even microchipped. These services are included in the adoption price, saving you a hefty bill from the veterinarian. 

Many shelter pets are already housebroken.
A lot of the animals at shelters were given up from their previous owners. This means many of them require little to no training on using a litter box or going outside. These animals likely have no issues with socializing with humans, but be sure to introduce them to your current pets before adopting if the shelter recommends it.

Shelter pets are often healthier than those bought elsewhere.
When animals are brought into shelters, they are given full physicals. Many shelters also have veterinary clinics on site to treat any medical conditions animals may have. This way, you’ll know the pet you’re adopting is in tip-top shape. 

Pet stores, and even some breeders, cannot guarantee the same health services for their animals that shelters can. Dogs sold at pet stores are often raised in puppy mills with unsanitary conditions, and they can carry diseases like pneumonia and parasites.

You’ll be supporting a worthy local charity.
By adopting a pet from an animal shelter, you’re helping a non-profit continue its mission. You can also spread the word about the shelter to those who ask where you got your pet. Shelters help the community by spaying and neutering their animals, reducing the odds of more unwanted animals.

You’ll find a friend for life.
Pets bring an endless amount of joy to people’s lives. They’ve been proven to be emotionally, physically and psychologically helpful to their owners. They can also alleviate feelings of loneliness. When you adopt a pet, you’re changing both its life and yours.

Adopting a pet from an animal shelter is one of the best things you can do for your happiness, as well as for your pet’s. It instills a sense of purpose and fulfillment. When you adopt, you can be proud you helped an animal in need.